Tag Archives: Melrose School

Melrose School Heritage Assessment fails exam

Merton Council rightly requires all development proposals in a Conservation Area to be accompanied by an assessment of its heritage impact.

This was lacking in the plans to expand Melrose School and we were pleased to see an assessment provided in short time once we had pointed out the absence.

Unfortunately what has been provided would fail any exam.

The wooded character of the land occupied by schools and offices south of Church Road makes an important contribution to the Conservation Area, with significant green spaces around the various buildings.

This is recognised in Merton Council’s Conservation Area Appraisal which notes that the built form is much more open, with large footprint buildings set in open grounds” and that “trees make an important contribution to the character of the area and also contribute to environmental quality by mitigating the effects of traffic noise and counteracting the effects of pollution….. The trees on the south side of Church Road between Vicarage Gardens and Lower Green West are a major feature of the conservation area contrasting with the more urban character prevailing on of the north side of the road.

Any Heritage Assessment should address the impact of development on this sense of openness and the area’s important trees.

Given the Melrose School expansion urbanises a large part of the remaining open space in its grounds and will result in the felling of seven trees this could be expected to be a major part of the assessment. Remarkably, there is not a single mention of either trees or the loss of open space in the document and so it fails in its task to assess the impact on the area’s heritage.

The Heritage Assessment also makes a school-child error in claiming “the nearest heritage asset is the nationally designated remains of a 14th century chapel archway that was built as part of Hall Place and stands on the adjacent Cricket Green School site“. In reality the Grade II listed buildings at 60, 62 & 64 Church Road and the Vicarage of Sts Peter and Paul are both closer. As a result the assessment of the impact of the development on these designated heritage assets is missing.

These flaws undermine the credibility of the whole assessment and will need to be addressed before a decision can be made on the plans.

Our earlier post on the Melrose School expansion

Read our representations on the Melrose School expansion Melrose School development – Sep 20

Read our additional representations on the flawed Heritage Assessment Melrose School development – additional representations – Oct 20

Melrose School expansion will result in unnecessary tree felling

Melrose School makes an important educational and community contribution to the area.

It is strategically located in wooded grounds between Church Road and London Road Playing Fields.

Merton Council decided in August to expand the school and provide for children of primary school age.

We have reviewed the development plans for new classrooms, a hall, new car park and other changes. These have a direct impact on that part of the school grounds which is in Mitcham Cricket Green Conservation Area and our fundamental concern is that a significant proportion of the remaining open space on the site is to be developed.

This will result in felling significant trees without any details as to how they will be replaced. Given the development is put forward by Merton Council and it will result in trees being felled that are the responsibility of Merton Council we are particularly concerned that no assessment of its heritage impact has been provided despite this being a requirement for developments in the Conservation Area.

Merton Council’s Design Review Panel only gave the plans an AMBER rating.

It recommended a two-storey option was considered “in order to maintain more open space and improve the general site layout. This also may take pressure off tree loss.” We agree. It is also perverse that despite this loss of trees the school is planning to include a new “Woodland teaching area”. It is a contradiction in terms to create a woodland teaching area on a site where the quality and number of trees is being reduced by a local authority which has declared a Climate Emergency.

We recognise the need to expand the school. We believe it can be achieved in a less damaging way with a better design that avoids extensive tree felling and causes less harm to the Conservation Area.

You can read our full submission Melrose School development