Tag Archives: Cricket Green Conservation Area

Shock and dismay at Merton Council’s plans to build over former Canons nursery

This is the second of two blog posts about plans put forward by Merton Council’s own development company, Merantun, for new development in the area.

It addresses proposals for blocks of 11 flats and seven houses on the former Canons nursery between The Canons house and Park Place.

We have already blogged about the development planned for Raleigh Gardens car park and also about the scope for Merantun to be a force for good across the borough.

Merton Council could hardly have chosen a more sensitive site for its first foray into housebuilding. It lies at the centre of the historic Canons landscape that is currently the focus of a major multi-million pound National Lottery funded project. It is in the middle of Mitcham Cricket Green Conservation Area, in a highly sensitive location between two nationally listed mansion houses, in the setting of a nationally listed 16th century dovecote and is bordered by a Grade II* listed boundary wall.

The site includes a magnificent Pagoda tree, which is Merton’s current Tree of the Year.

When we reviewed the options in a major public meeting back in 2013 the local community was clear that the former nursery should be used for purposes that respect its history and link it to the wider Canons landscape.

We have reviewed all 30 reports, drawings, assessments and other information which make up the planning application and concluded that the development proposed falls woefully short of what is appropriate.

It is sad to report that the longest and most detailed response we have ever made is to a planning application is for a development proposed by Merton Council on one of its own flagship historic sites. We conclude:

  • the designs lack inspiration and, in the words of the Design Review Panel are “too busy, intense and slightly military in feel” – have a look at the drawing above of the view from Park Place’s car park and let us know if you see barracks or homes
  • in all 30 documents we can find no reference to the Canons Conservation Management Plan despite this being adopted by Merton Council as a Supplementary Planning Document in September 2017
  • the “Heritage Assessment” accompanying the plans should shame any heritage professional – a 26 page document devotes just six weak paragraphs to assessing the impact of the new development and concludes by singing its praises. Even Merton Council’s own Design Review Panel concluded “There was some scepticism from the Panel regarding the rather emphatic conclusion reported in the review material”
  • there is no assessment of the impact of the development from The Canons, Park Place or the east lawn and dovecote – this may be because it could only conclude that the developments will create a major new built intrusion that will cause substantial harm to these heritage assets and open spaces
  • the designs include a three storey blank wall which should have no place in any new building let alone one in such a sensitive location – see the image below
  • on the one hand the reports state that “the site is currently an underused, poor quality open space” as justification for its development while on the other the ecological survey concludes that the “site has significant ecological value, as it has been left unmanaged for some time, and has developed a seminatural character” – both cannot be true and the site could have been a major beneficiary of Lottery investment with a different approach
  • Merton Council proposes to gate the site off to the public instead of opening it up in direct conflict with the wider ambitions of the National Lottery funded project to increase public access and enjoyment of The Canons grounds
  • there are other unresolved and seemingly unaddressed conflicts with the National Lottery project, including conflict over use of the car park, bin lorries and other servicing and how the two major construction projects can be progressed at the same time
  • the scheme’s architects have displayed a woeful understanding of the local area and could not even name the wonderful Pagoda tree that lies at the heart of their plans when questioned at our Open Meeting in August
  • the future of the Pagoda tree is imperilled by being so boxed in by development on three sides that there is at one point barely one metre between the building and the tree’s canopy, remembering that this already large tree is only middle aged and can be expected to grow much larger
  • a mature yew tree deemed “essential” in earlier tree surveys and identified as a potential bat roost is proposed to be felled rather than used a starting point for the design
  • despite careful controls over lighting elsewhere in The Canons grounds because of feeding bats there are plans for five uplighters and significant light pollution
  • there is no affordable housing provided and this is planned to be included in another scheme on Elm Nursery car park despite it being contrary to Merton’s own planning policy for affordable homes to be integrated into all new development

The Canons deserves so much better.

We are asking Merton Council to withdraw Merantun’s scheme or otherwise see it rejected for its impact on this historic area and its conflict with Merton’s own planning policies.

 

 

Read our full submission on Merantun’s plans for the former Canons nursery – Development of former Canons nursery – January 2020

Tree felling shock reverberates down the years

This is a sad tale of lost trees and bureaucratic inaction played out in a Cricket Green garden behind Preshaw Crescent.

Back in 2015 a large number of mature trees were felled and a large garden cleared in anticipation of development plans for a block of flats being submitted.

All mature trees in the Conservation Area are automatically protected and Merton Council needs to permit their felling.

No permission was given for an act that the landowner later described as an “embarrassment”. The photo shows before and after images and the garden has now been cleared by a digger to bare earth.

We joined with local residents in asking Merton Council to take action against this blatant breach of planning safeguards.

The response was to deal with the issue as part of the decision on the planning applications subsequently submitted to develop the garden site. Merton’s Tree Officer emailed in December 2016 that “I have written to the owner about this matter, and he is now aware that the council expects new replacement trees to be planted.”

In the event two planning applications were submitted. These included the statement that “This occurrence is an embarrassment to the applicant and all involved with developing the proposals for this development and something that we all wish to put right as part of the development process.

One application was never progressed and the other was turned down in late 2019 after two years of consideration.

Imagine the dismay, therefore, when we asked Merton’s Tree Officer what action was being taken to put right the wrong done to the trees in 2015 and were told that “the power to enforce tree replacement is time limited to 4 years, and as this time has now expired no further action in the form of enforcement can be taken.”

We have asked our ward councillors to look into the issue. There is every impression of officers asleep on the job and allowing the wilful loss of mature trees just as Merton Council announces a climate and ecological emergency. A simple calendar reminder to take action if the situation had not been resolved would have served to ensure the enforcement deadline was not missed.

There is one potential silver lining. A new application has been submitted for the site. While the proposed flats are too large and develop too much of the site it does provide an opportunity for the owner to put right the wrong and for Merton Council to insist on trees being provided equivalent to those that were lost.

We ask you to join us in watching what happens next.

Read our full representations on the latest development for the garden of 8 Preshaw Crescent Land behind Preshaw Crescent – January 2020

Kwik Fit redevelopment unfit for Conservation Area

A new developer has put in plans to redevelop the former Kwik Fit site.

This has lain empty for years now and we are keen to see it developed in a way that respects its location at the gateway to the Conservation Area and in key views from the historic cricket ground and listed Burn Bullock.

Merton Council gave permission for 22 flats in 2016 for a shockingly poor development that led us to call for the site’s removal from the Conservation Area. With a new owner the site provides an opportunity for a flagship building of a standard which could be listed within 30 years.

The new application falls woefully short of this potential.

Its five storeys will overwhelm surrounding buildings and intrude on existing homes in Broadway Gardens and Highfield Court. The building will be a significant imposition on the key view from Mitcham cricket ground and damage its setting and that of the Grade II listed Burn Bullock by virtue of its scale and the poor quality elevation facing London Road.

In direct conflict with planning policy none of the 24 flats will be affordable. The developer backs this decision with reports claiming the scheme wouldn’t be viable. We have asked Merton Council to subject these to independent review.

The development includes over 400 sq m on the ground floor for retail or commercial use. This is welcome. The developer says it is in in talks with the Co-op. Similar talks with the same supermarket fell through over the road at Justin Plaza when this was converted from offices to flats. As a result we ended up with more flats on the ground floor. We have asked Merton Council to ensure the ground floor is put to good use before any flats are sold if the development does get permission.

The development has come forward at the same time as plans for 19 flats and around half the area of retail or office space on the ground floor on the car wash site across Broadway Gardens.  Taken together the plans will means Broadway Gardens residents being forced to pass through a canyon of new building to get to their homes and an excessively high wall of new development along a major stretch London Road just where it enters the Conservation Area.

These are both sites where development is needed and we are disappointed to find ourselves once again having to object to what is proposed. A high quality development of three to four storeys with shops on the ground floor to fill this gap in London Road would be very suitable.

Neither developer has engaged the local community before submitting their plans. We are asking for better for both sites and the opportunity for local people to shape what is going to happen to their neighbourhood.

Read our comments on plans for the former KwikFit site Development of KwikFit site – January 2020

Read our blog and comments on the car wash site 

Red light for old fire station hoardings

The new owner of the old fire station has submitted a planning application for hoardings to be erected for a year while they sort out what is going to happen with the now empty building.

As anyone walking round the area will know there are already hoardings on the site which have been erected without permission.

We are strongly objecting to the plans.

They enclose a large area of land in front of the old fire station which has nothing to do with providing security for an empty building.

The effect will be to block views across Lower Green West, damage the special setting of the listed war memorial and impinge on the surroundings of the locally listed fire station and Vestry Hall.

Remarkably, the area proposed for the hoardings is all owned by Merton Council and not the applicants.

We have asked our local councillors to ensure that, as responsible landowners, Merton Council puts a halt to such unnecessary and damaging proposals even before a decision is made on the planning application.

Read our representations – Fire station hoardings – Dec 19

Find out what we have said about plans for the fire station itself – Old Mitcham fire station plans a non-starter

See how we wanted to transform the old fire station – Mitcham’s cultural revolution

Cricket Green Charter launched

As the 50th anniversary year of Mitcham Cricket Green Conservation Area draws to a close we have published a new Cricket Green Charter.

It sets out principles to be used by everyone involved in policies, investment priorities and decisions about the future of Cricket Green.

The Charter has been prepared following wide consultation with local people, including a public workshop supported by local councillors and Merton Council.

The rich story of Cricket Green told through its buildings, open spaces and people sets the standard for how the area should evolve. Undertaking new development which adds to this story is a privilege and all proposals for change should be required to show how they add positively to Cricket Green’s future.

The Charter identifies green spaces and community assets to be protected, local shopping parades and employment sites to be safeguarded, brownfield sites to be developed and streets and public spaces in need of new investment.

It calls for the highest standards of design with a new design code and an expectation that any development facing one of the greens should be of a quality that could be listed within 30 years.  The major developments planned for the Wilson and Benedict Wharf are identified as priorities for community-led design and proposals made for new routes to make the area easier to walk around.

The Charter calls for an end to the uncertainty over Mitcham cricket pavilion and for it to be transferred into community ownership.

It is also looking for management plans to be prepared for all the green spaces and a programme of tree and hedge planting to reduce air pollution and contribute to tackling the climate emergency.

There is a need for more places to meet and things to see and do, including restoring the historic pubs and providing more cultural events, coffee shops, activities and venues for all parts of the community.

The Charter establishes that Cricket Green should be an affordable location to live and land for custom and self-build homes and a community land trust should be provided.

There is a call for Merton Council to enforce planning controls and deal swiftly with unsightly clusters of estate agent boards and ‘bad neighbour’ activity such as fly tipping, fly posting and illegal parking and advertising.

We hope everyone with an interest in Cricket Green and its environs will support the Cricket Green Charter. If you would like to get involved then please join us and help shape the future of our neighbourhood. 

Cricket Green Charter – for reading online

Cricket Green Charter – to download, print and fold as a leaflet

Architects confirm negative impact of Mitcham scheme on Conservation Area

Plans to demolish and replace a large stretch of Mitcham’s shops on Upper Green East alongside Barclays Bank with a four storey block are being considered by Merton Council.

The scheme will set the precedent for future development around Fair Green and we believe it is both too high and lacks design quality.

It also fails to provide a single affordable home in any of the 20 flats.

The architects have made some minor changes in response to feedback from Mitcham Society and ourselves.

The changes fail to address the fundamental problem that the new building is too large, too high and too poorly designed for Mitcham’s centre.

There is even a suggestion that adding lavender mosaic tiles somehow represents an adequate response to the historic character of the area.

The new information also includes a new image that confirms the impact on the Conservation Area from near Three Kings Pond.

The architects believe the scheme will be “just visible”.

We believe the image confirms the creation of an intrusive bland elevation which doesn’t fit with the existing pitched roofline. Have a look and see what you think.

 

Read our original representation and our updated one